Tag Archives | River

fishing in rivers

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Parrs Diary – February 2017

I’m not entirely sure where February went. One moment January was dragging its feet and a couple of blinks later the blackbirds are singing and March is upon us. The thin end of the coarse season always seems to rattle by, but I did manage to make it out three times over the past month, […]

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Parr’s Diary – January 2017

It was great to see Mark Walsingham (Skeff) on CountryFile earlier this month. He was with Dave Webb of the UK Wild Otter Trust to explain the new otter trapping licence, and the two of them featured in a segment focused on the current otter ‘debate’. Much of the piece was filmed at Ashmead, Skeff’s […]

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Origins

In memory of Niall Fallon, who passed away on 26th January 1996. Originally penned by Garrett Fallon in 1992. As a child I had little appetite for work, seeing it as something horrid that served you right for growing old. I also had a distinct lack of interest in grownups, as they talked incessantly of […]

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Parr’s Diary – December 2016

Festive television is invariably underwhelming. Full of re-makes, repeats and Christmas ‘specials’ that make you smile, but only because the excess of port and stilton has left you mildly stupefied. I did watch Charlie Brooker’s 2016 Wipe last evening though, and it certainly didn’t disappoint. Mind you, the past twelve months have delivered plenty of […]

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Tale of two rivers, issue 8

To coincide with the launch of Fallon’s Angler issue eight, photographer Nick Fallowfield-Cooper caught a glimpse of the contrasting worlds of Paul and Tim, two lifetime Norfolk anglers who fish rivers of a very different nature, The Great Ouse and the Wensum. Written by editor Garrett Fallon, the story unfolds in the new issue, now […]

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Parr’s Diary – October 2016

I have always had a peculiar relationship with the Dorset Stour. A couple of visits as a child and teenager offered me a river full of mystery and intrigue, but after a long period of barbel obsession (that had a distinct chalk stream edge) I struggled to understand the Stour when I returned to her […]

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River Habitats for Coarse Fish by Mark Everard

(Old Pond Publishing, 2015) By Theo Pike In these days when all the funky river menders are talking about catchment-scale processes, natural flood management, and even rewilding with beavers, it’s feeling rather rare to find a book that’s just about fish. More to the point, it’s even rarer to find a book that’s just about […]

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First casts of a dry fly

“It has always been my private conviction that any man who pits his intelligence against a fish and loses has it coming.”  John Steinbeck No matter how great we think we are, we are quickly brought back down to earth by those finned creatures that swim and attract our longing. I have caught a few […]

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Parr’s Diary: April 2016

I spent a few hours yesterday wandering the heath and bog of Wareham Forest. I heard my first cuckoo of the year, found lizards basking and lost an hour listening to the lamenting song of the woodlark. In the thick of the bog was a dark, peaty pond, reed-lined and slightly rank. A sedge warbler tchked […]

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River Tiddy

The rivers of Cornwall have long had an association with the Atlantic salmon. Spate rivers such as the Taw, Torridge and Camel have drawn anglers from all over the country, and despite the decline on salmon numbers, produce good fish every season. In south-east Cornwall another salmon river flows unnoticed by many. The Tiddy is […]

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My River

Written by Greg Freestone There’s a river not far from here. It’s a miniature river, a Trumpton river winding through toy-towns and out into their rural hinterlands, flowing beneath hilltop churches, through ancient fords and under bridges, draining and watering this ever-thinning strip of old farming Essex, a shallow agricultural valley still surviving against constant assault […]

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Backwaters

While reading of Vic Gent’s First Casts in Issue 5 of Fallon’s angler, one particular sentiment struck a chord. Vic describes his early efforts on the River Nene upstream of Peterborough, and more specifically a small backwater that could only be fished from a boat. Such a place sounds heavenly, especially, Fishpool suspects, through the eyes […]

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New Year

Words by Nigel Ling New Year’s “fabled infant” comes to me stillborn. After the festival of Christmas I cannot shake off January’s slump; the winter bears down, the dim fairy lights in house windows, waiting on Twelfth Night, are relics of a better time. Fishing in January is usually hard; floods are expected and cold […]

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Tiger fish

The last episode of the recent BBC2 series Earth’s Wildest Waters – The Big Fish, found the three finalists in Zambia, south-central Africa, where they tackled the mighty Zambezi River. The target species was the tiger fish (Hydrocynus Vittatus), a fearsome looking fish with teeth so prominent that resident judge Matt Hayes compared its dentistry […]

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Piranhas

Ah, the late seventies…..a time when music was real, man…. The Sex Pistols were busting the establishment with Never Mind the Bollocks.., The Clash were fighting the law, and out of Brighton came The Piranhas – a ska band whose cover of Tom Hark had people shimmying around disco halls right across the country. Despite […]

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The Zambezi

Aaahhhh – all together now! – ‘Zambezi, Zambezi, Zambezi, Zam, I’m on me way,’ – who could forget such timeless lyrics? Written by Nico Carstons and covered by a host of artists such as Acker Bilk, Chet Atkins and (most memorably for Fishpool, at least) The Piranhas, ‘Zambezi’ must be one of the most infuriatingly catchy […]

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Bleak

For many anglers, the humble bleak (Alburnus alburnus) is looked upon with little fondness. It is a small fish, the British record is around 4 ½ ounces, that tends to congregate on large shoals and will snatch a bait intended for a quarry far larger. Found predominantly in flowing water, the bleak a long, slim, […]

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Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve always meant a midday finish, and though there were a few loose ends to tie, the bulk of the morning would be spent nattering and clockwatching. I’d turn my computer on, and probably check my emails, but even my games of solitaire would be half hearted. In years past I would have clocked […]

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Roach

Fishpool recently wrote of the bronze bream, and how many anglers regard the mature adult fish as a separate species to the smaller, juvenile ‘skimmers’. A similar moniker could be levelled at the roach (Rutlius rutlius) – a species that might not change too much in colour and all round appearance as it ages, but […]

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Golden mahseer

Certain species of fish seem to represent perfectly the landscape of their environment. The taimen in the vast plains of Central Asia; the blue marlin in the deep azure of the open ocean; and the golden mahseer (Tor putitora) in the mythical and spiritual waters within the foothills of the Himalaya. The golden mahseer is one […]

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Pursuing the perfect perch

“Come on son. We’re gowan to ketch a perch,” sez he. I was too young to shave and still at an age when I thought girls were pointless and as annoying as acne. But I followed him like a puppy, yapping at his heels in joy. We approached the old stone bridge that crossed a […]

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Zander

Few ‘British’ fish divide opinion quite as much as the zander (Sander lucioperca). A fish non-native to the British Isles but common across mainland Europe, the zander was first introduced into Woburn Abbey Lakes in 1878 by the Duke of Bedford. Though movements of fish were made subsequently, it was not until 1963, when 97 […]

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Grayling

The graying (Thymallus thymallus) is an often overlooked fish. The presence of an adipose fin places the species (taxonomically at least) with the Salmonidae, but the grayling has not been looked upon favourably in many rivers, such as the Itchen, where it swims beside the more desirable trout and salmon. Most coarse anglers, meanwhile, are […]

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Three men in a boat

  Why is it that we spend so much of our lives running, when really all we’d like to do is walk? We have a propensity to complicate our days, rush through them, fill them with activity, purpose, goals and achievements. But does it actually get us anywhere? Do we actually know where it is […]

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River Tone

Fishpool once spent a rather pleasant afternoon in Taunton, tucking into the scrumpy from the bars of the County Ground as I enjoyed a complimentary ticket to the cricket. The only thing lacking was the presence of a seriously destructive batsman. This was long before Chris Gayle’s fireworks and the days of Viv Richards and […]

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The Wensum

Rising close to the village of Whissonsett, in north central Norfolk, the River Wensum is a river with a fine angling pedigree and a diverse cross section of wildlife. A nationally important chalk water habitat, the Wensum is home to more than 100 plant species and was designated a Special Area of Conservation in 2001. […]

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The Danube

Rising in Germany’s Black Forest, the Danube is one of the world’s great rivers. At 1,189 miles it is Europe’s second longest to the Volga, and flows through ten countries before emptying into the Black Sea. Once the long standing frontier of the Roman Empire, the Danube flows through four modern day Capital Cities – […]

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Luck of the Irish

“May the luck of the Irish be with you!” is a well-known Irish blessing. I’m not sure of its origins, seeing as I don’t remember being especially lucky at any time, if you discount meeting a lovely lass and marrying her, and having a wonderful child. I’d like to think those things happened because I […]

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The Wandle

An urban chalk stream? In South London? No fooling? It’s true, and the River Wandle isn’t alone, though it probably offers anglers the greatest variety of fishing. Fed by water cleansed by the chalk aquifers of the North Downs, the Wandle first shows itself in Croydon, before slipping its way through Merton and Sutton and […]

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Steve Roberts

Steve Roberts was born within casting distance of Old Father Thames, where he spent a halcyon boyhood catching perch from beneath wind ruffled willows. He evolved as an angler on the idyllic river Kennet, where he chased barbel among the thick, waving fronds of ranunculus. Having caught his fill of whoppers the lure of spring […]

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Barbel

From the savagery of the bite, to the endless power of the fight, hooking a barbel (Barbus barbus) is an unforgettable experience. These are fish of fast flows and strong currents, using the weight and power of the water to hold station against the bottom – their stream-lined shape perfectly suited to life in the […]

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Sweets

At the end of a terrace in the small market town of Usk, upon the river of the same name, sits the most extraordinary fishing tackle shop in Britain. Sweets Fishing Tackle has been trading on Porthycarne Street for nearly a century, and little has changed in that time. Originally founded by Harry Powell, inventor […]

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The Royalty Fishery

The Hampshire Avon slips through some of the most stunning and historic land in the country. Sprung from the chalk aquifers of Salisbury Plain, the upper river sparkles through archaeological heaven. Stonehenge, Woodhenge, the ancient metropolis of Durrington Walls, then, of course, through Salisbury whereafter it is alternatively named. Having watered Ringwood and skirted the […]

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The Thames

Rising at Thames Head, near the Cotswold village of Kemble, the Thames meanders across southern England for 215 miles, providing anglers with an array of angling opportunity. Some of our most revered anglers have cut their teeth on the Thames (such as Peter Stone – People we Like) and every season some extraordinary fish are […]

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A first trip to the Test

The River Test perks the ear of any angler. My late father would often talk about it in exalted tones, referring to its glorious brown trout. In later years, I learned of its grayling, and as my circle of angling interests widened, its big roach and dace. To have the chance to fish it was […]

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The Sheringham Society on the Wye

By Michael Comyns Where can you get a conker match, a cello recital and a crack at a double-figure barbel?   Well, I don’t know where or when they might occur together again, but on a recent weekend at Llanthomas, where The Sheringham Society held its Autumnal Equinox Meet—dedicated to the memory of a recently departed […]

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